Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Crime

New York City Council Defies Mayor, Passes Bill to Ban Solitary Confinement in City Jails

New York City Council Defies Mayor, Passes Bill to Ban Solitary Confinement in City Jails
New York City Council Defies Mayor, Passes Bill to Ban Solitary Confinement in City Jails

Controversial Legislation Sparks Debate Over Safety and Due Process

In a bold move against Mayor Eric Adams’ objections, the New York City Council has approved legislation aimed at banning solitary confinement in the city’s jails. The contentious bill, passed on Wednesday, has ignited a heated debate over the impact on both inmates and staff.

New York City Council Defies Mayor, Passes Bill to Ban Solitary Confinement in City Jails

New York City Council Defies Mayor, Passes Bill to Ban Solitary Confinement in City Jails

Mayor Adams, a Democrat, urged the City Council to reject the bill, expressing concerns that its implementation would heighten the dangers within jails. However, the legislation received overwhelming support and boasts enough backing on the council to override any potential veto from the mayor.

The bill imposes a four-hour limit on isolating inmates deemed an immediate risk of violence to themselves or others in “de-escalation” units. Long-term restrictive housing is reserved only for those involved in violent incidents, ensuring they have access to the same programming as other inmates and are allowed out of their cells for 14 hours daily.

Introduced by New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams, the bill asserts that solitary confinement amounts to torture, citing research that links such isolation to increased risks of suicide, violence, and overdose. Advocates argue that the practice also leads to severe mental health issues, hindering an inmate’s reintegration into society upon release.

The vote comes at a critical time for the city, facing the possibility of federal intervention to curb violence at the notorious Rikers Island jail complex. It follows a broader city plan to eventually close Rikers and mirrors California’s attempt last year to limit segregated confinement, ultimately vetoed by Governor Gavin Newsom.

Solitary confinement gained national attention following the tragic case of Kalief Browder, a 16-year-old who spent three years at Rikers, half of it in solitary, awaiting a trial that never occurred. Browder’s ordeal led to the cessation of solitary confinement for 16- and 17-year-olds in the city.

Despite recent limits imposed by the city Board of Correction, a report from the Columbia University Center for Justice revealed instances of inmates being confined for longer periods than allowed. The City Council’s decision to support the bill reflects a push for reform in the criminal justice system.

Mayor Adams, declining to confirm a potential veto, criticized a provision requiring a hearing before placing an inmate in solitary, deeming it nonsensical in a televised interview. The Correction Officers’ Benevolent Association and the conservative Common Sense Caucus also voiced opposition.

As the city grapples with issues of safety, due process, and criminal justice reform, the passage of this bill marks a pivotal moment in shaping the future of incarceration practices in New York City.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Evergreen

Milwaukee, WI – A recent report on crime rates in Milwaukee has identified the 15 most dangerous neighborhoods, shedding light on areas grappling with...

Finance

Governor Glenn Youngkin of Virginia announces the rollout  of Virginia $400 tax rebate checks this week, alongside the launch of an online tool to...

Evergreen

Violent and property crime on the rise, urging residents to stay vigilant and take precautions.   In a recent study analyzing crime rates across...

Finance

The Oregon Treasury’s recent announcement about its “Checks Without Claims” program is bringing excitement as $10 million in unclaimed property is set to be...