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U.S. Imposes Final Duties on Food Can Steel Imports from China, Canada, Germany, and Korea

U.S. Imposes Final Duties on Food Can Steel Imports from China, Canada, Germany, and Korea
U.S. Imposes Final Duties on Food Can Steel Imports from China, Canada, Germany, and Korea

The U.S. Commerce Department has finalized its decision to impose duties on tin mill products imported from China, Canada, Germany, and South Korea. The investigation found that these imports were being dumped onto the U.S. market, with additional subsidies for Chinese tin mill products.

U.S. Imposes Final Duties on Food Can Steel Imports from China, Canada, Germany, and Korea

U.S. Imposes Final Duties on Food Can Steel Imports from China, Canada, Germany, and Korea

According to the Commerce Department’s statement on Friday, tin mill products, a key component in the production of cans for food, paint, aerosol products, and various containers, were not being dumped from the Netherlands, Taiwan, Turkey, and the United Kingdom.

The final duties align with the preliminary anti-dumping duties imposed in August, with notable exceptions for China. The imposed duties are considerably lower than the initially sought double-digit and triple-digit figures by U.S. steelmaker Cleveland-Cliffs and the United Steelworkers union in their petition for the investigation filed a year ago.

China faces the highest final anti-dumping duties of 122.5% on tin mill steel imports. Additionally, countervailing anti-subsidy duties of 650% were imposed on tin mill products from leading Chinese producer Baoshan Iron and Steel Co Ltd, with 331.9% on all other Chinese steelmakers.

German producers, including ThyssenKrupp Rasselstein, received final anti-dumping duties of 6.88%, while Canadian producers, including ArcelorMittal Dofasco, were hit with final anti-dumping duties of 5.27%. South Korea’s KG Dongbu Steel faces a final anti-dumping duty rate of 2.69%.

Canada expressed disappointment with the findings, stating that these duties would weaken supply chains and exacerbate the impact of inflation on both sides of the border. Canada’s trade minister, Mary Ng, affirmed that the country would continue to defend the interests of its steel industry and workers.

The Commerce Department’s decision upheld its earlier findings that tin-plate steel from the Netherlands, Taiwan, Turkey, and Britain were not dumped. With the U.S. producing less than half of the tin mill steel it consumes, the packaging industry relies heavily on imported steel.

For these duties to remain in effect, the U.S. International Trade Commission must determine that American producers have sustained material injury due to the dumping findings. The vote on this matter is expected in the coming weeks.

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